World Breastfeeding Week! August 1-7

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This week  is World Breastfeeding Week!

August 1st – 7th

Breastfeeding: A Key to Sustainable Development

Please check out these great flyers and articles from the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA). They do an amazing job every year providing resources and support for the health and wellbeing of all babies.

World Breastfeeding Week – Public Announcement

World Breastfeeding Week – Objectives of WABA

World Breastfeeding Week – Nutrition, Food Security, and Poverty Reduction

UNICEF – Letter of Support

UNICEF – Social Media Materials

“Breastfeeding is not only the cornerstone of a child’s healthy development; it is also the foundation of a country’s development” UNICEF

 

Long-Term Consequences of Adoption

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I have found some great articles on the long-term consequences of adoption. Those that adopt or place their child up for adoption must be aware of the possible issues that could occur at any time during this sensitive process. This post is in no way trying to discourage those interested in adopting to be afraid or have doubts, but rather an opportunity to educate yourself and prepare as best as possible if these issues arise. There are groups and support available to you if you need help navigating this very emotional and complicated time in your life.

For the Child

Research on Long-Term Effects

Long Term Issues for the Adopted Child

Impact of Adoption on Adopted Persons – PDF

Trauma that Lasts a Lifetime

Long-Term Effects of Adoption: An Empirical Study of Adult Adoptees

Statistics on the Effects of Adoption

For Birthmothers/Parents

Impact of Adoption on Birth Parents: Responding to the Adoptive Placement

The Impact of Adoption on Birth Parents

Impact of Adoption on Birth Parents – PDF

Long Term Issues for Birthmothers after Adoption – AMHC

For Adoptive Parents

Fears Regarding Adoption

Things to Do While Waiting For Your Adopted Child

Impact of Adoption on Adoptive Parents

The Psychology of Adoption and Foster Care

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After the holidays are over it is easy to forget the children that received donated toys through programs such as Toys for Tots, are still in need of loving homes. These children had a moment of happiness, but what happens to those still in foster care or waiting to be adopted? What are the long-term psychological and physiological challenges that these children go through from conception until safely placed into loving homes? Are "loving homes" enough to repair the damage that some of these infants and children have been through? It takes persistence, consistency, and providing the appropriate resources to give these children the best start and future possible.

Adopting through Foster Care

The foster care system is in desperate need of good families that can provide care for children of all ages. Often these children are move from home to home and become separated from their siblings. This has been shown to exacerbate the separation trauma that they have already experienced. Repairing and establishing a bond with these children is imperative for their future and overall health and wellbeing. Many foster children are eventually returned to their biological families but then suffer the consequences of the trauma (separation or otherwise) that they will need help to heal from. There are excellent resources for foster children and parents such as:

The Westside Children’s Center

FosterCare.com

Adoption Voices Magazine

Adopting an Infant

Adopting an infant, although rewarding, can be very traumatic for all involved. The birth mother needs a lot of support as she grieves the loss of her child, even if she rationally knows it is what is best for her baby. The baby has to readjust and grieve the loss of its mother and what s/he has known for at least the last 9+ months, even if it was a toxic environment. In addition, the adoptive parents must adjust to their new roles as parents and form attachments to this child that might feel very difficult at first. Skin-to-Skin contact during this time is critical for establishing trust and a secure bond with your new baby. If you are thinking about adopting in the United States there are some great resources available to you such as

Child Welfare – Department of Health and Human Services

National Adoption Center

Adoptive Families

Adopting a Child From Another Country

Thousands of orphans in other countries are in need of being adopted each year. Each one of these children will have a unique set of needs and obstacles to overcome. Learning how to meet these needs can be challenging for some, especially if there is a language barrier. Sometimes these children are not held or touched very often, which can lead to sensory and attachment issues. If you are thinking about adopting internationally, please do your research and get counsel on how to best prepare yourself.

InterCountry Adoption – U.S. Department of State

Adoptive Families – International Adoption Facts

International Orphan Aid and Adoption Assistance

Adopting a Step or Relative Child

As with all family dynamics, adopting a spouse’s child or a relative comes with its own set of challenges. In these types of situations where there could be a high intensity of emotions, (such as with custody battles), making decisions the best interest of the child is imperative. Often these children are caught in the middle of a war they did not ask for. Making the transition as easy as possible will help them feel secure in the decisions you as the parent or guardian make for them.

*Please always go through established and trusted adoption agencies. Adoption Counselors and Attorneys are an excellent resource to help you navigate through your adoption process!

Happy 2016!

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I hope you all had a wonderful holiday season!

First, I want to thank everyone who has stuck around throughout the years! This blog has been at a standstill for the last few months but I have some great plans here for the New Year!

After some long overdue planning, I have decided that I will be providing content on a new topic each month. This will not only allow me to spend more time discussing the information more in depth but also provide more material and resources covering each subject.

January is Adoption and Foster Care Month!

I will be covering topics such as

  • Adoption and Foster Care / Types of Adoptions
  • The Long Term Effects on the Child
  • Affects on Adoptive Parents, Birth Parents, & Families
  • Bonding with Your Adopted Child

I look forward to this blogging year and hope we all learn a little something along the way!

@BabyBonding is now on Instagram!

Happy Mother’s Day!

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I hope you all have a wonderful Mother’s Day!

World Doula Week

Happy World Doula Week!

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“The purpose of World Doula Week is to empower doulas to improve the physiological, social, emotional, and psychological health of women, newborns, and families in birth and in the postpartum period.”

Join in on the conversation and events on Facebook!  – World Doula Week

A Birth Doula is a professional that provides advice, information, emotional support, and physical comfort to a mother before, during, and just after childbirth.

Examples of Doula Support During
Vaginal & Cesarean Births
Click on image to enlarge 

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Postpartum Doulas help make the transition into parenthood easier for new parents. She educates and supports the family so that feel capable of caring for their newborn. I am currently working on become certified as a Postpartum Doula with CAPPA!

A Postpartum Doula Offers

  • Physical support
  • Emotional Support
  • Spiritual Support
  • Breastfeeding and bottle feeding support and tips
  • Baby care instruction
  • Household assistance
  • Sibling care
  • Meal preparation
  • Errand running

CAPPA, 2015

The Importance of Prenatal Care

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    Whether you are pregnant with your first or fifth child, your prenatal health is essential to the best birth and long term health for you and your baby. Prenatal care helps to reduce the risk of disease and promotes health and safety for the best possible outcome.

    With so many medical tests and information a mother receives during her pregnancy, it is hard to determine what tests are necessary. Blood pressure checks, urine tests, and blood tests are considered routine in most medical offices, where as, amniocentesis, glucose tolerance tests, and cordocentesis are more invasive and potentially harmful to the baby. The risks and benefits of these tests must be carefully considered. One of the best ways to assess your risks is to educated yourself about the procedure your doctor is wanting to perform. Read about it, ask questions to your health care provider, talk to others that have had the same procedure, become as informed as possible!

    The American Pregnancy Association has some great information on pregnancy and an entire section about prenatal tests that your doctor may want to perform, if he or she feels that there is cause for concern. Being informed is essential before proceeding with any medical tests or interventions during your pregnancy, labor, or birth!

     

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