Long-Term Consequences of Adoption

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I have found some great articles on the long-term consequences of adoption. Those that adopt or place their child up for adoption must be aware of the possible issues that could occur at any time during this sensitive process. This post is in no way trying to discourage those interested in adopting to be afraid or have doubts, but rather an opportunity to educate yourself and prepare as best as possible if these issues arise. There are groups and support available to you if you need help navigating this very emotional and complicated time in your life.

For the Child

Research on Long-Term Effects

Long Term Issues for the Adopted Child

Impact of Adoption on Adopted Persons – PDF

Trauma that Lasts a Lifetime

Long-Term Effects of Adoption: An Empirical Study of Adult Adoptees

Statistics on the Effects of Adoption

For Birthmothers/Parents

Impact of Adoption on Birth Parents: Responding to the Adoptive Placement

The Impact of Adoption on Birth Parents

Impact of Adoption on Birth Parents – PDF

Long Term Issues for Birthmothers after Adoption – AMHC

For Adoptive Parents

Fears Regarding Adoption

Things to Do While Waiting For Your Adopted Child

Impact of Adoption on Adoptive Parents

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You Might Need a Prenatal and Infant Psychology Specialist if…

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Early intervention is the best prevention.

  • Are you unsure whether you and your baby have bonded well or if something has gotten in the way of building a positive bond, such as a hospitalization for you or your baby, postpartum depression, adoption or foster care, extreme fussiness or severe parent stresses?
  • Does your baby have trouble taking in comfort by looking away, stiffening or arching away when held, or doesn’t calm down when comforted?
  • After 6 months of age, does your baby not show any stranger awareness or does not respond differently to parents and unfamiliar people?
  • Is your baby excessively clingy or anxious? Will he or she not move away from you even for a short distance to explore toys or interact with other children?
  • Are you having a hard time liking your baby, or if it seems as though most of your interactions are negative or upsetting?
  • Are you worried about your baby’s sleeping, feeding, toilet training, or other concerning behavior?
  • Do you feel that you overreact, yell, or hit your child, or feel extreme distress when your child shows certain typical or unusual behaviors?
  • Are you concerned about how your own experience of being birthed, raised, or parented might affect your own parenting?
  • Are you or your baby having trouble with breastfeeding or other feeding methods?

These are only a few examples of how prenatal and infant psychology could benefit you and your baby. If you are concerned about yourself or your baby, please contact contact me at InfantPsychology@gmail.com for more information.

“Attachment behavior is any form of behavior that results in a person attaining or maintaining proximity to some other clearly identified individual who is conceived as better able to cope with the world.”  – A Secure Base, John Bowlby

Childbirth and Child Psychology Articles

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Why Is Childbirth So Expensive in the U.S.?

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Rare Birth Defect on the Rise

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How Exercise During Pregnancy Can Make Childbirth Easier

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Beyond Attachment to Parents: Children Need Community

‘”For good biological reasons, children want and need to move beyond their parents.”

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Good Parenting

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No Oxytocin Benefit for Autism

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Investigating ADHD in Children Born Prematurely

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Merleau-Ponty’s Child Psychology

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A Parent’s Prerogative: You Have the Right to Change Your Mind

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Understanding Children’s Emotions: The Importance of Curiosity and Interest

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Taking a New Look at Human Development

“Jerome Kagan has been at the forefront of developmental psychology..he was once listed as the 22d most influential psychologist of the 20th century — right ahead of Carl Jung and Ivan Pavlov.”

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Postpartum Depression and Mental Health Support

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“This Emotional Life”: Postpartum Depression

“Bonding is a process, not a finite event”

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Mental Health Support for Pregnant Women & New Mothers is Not Good Enough, Report Says

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10 Ways to Cope with Postpartum Depression

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More on Postpartum Depression

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Economic Abuse Affects Maternal Mental Health, Parenting

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Mothers who experience economic and psychological abuse during the first year of a relationship with their child’s father are more likely to become depressed and spank the child in year five, researchers from the Rutgers School of Social Work have found.

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Strategies for Dealing with Difficult Children

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Dealing with a child’s naughtiness appropriately can go a long way to helping them develop into a happy and healthy adult. Source: National Features

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